000 WLA – What Is the Wireless LAN Answers Podcast?

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Wireless LAN Answers
This audio Podcast will be starting sometime in March 2010. Hosted by some of the world’s best Wireless LAN Professionals, we’ll answer live your questions concerning all things concerning Wireless Networking.  Working with other co-hosts, Keith R. Parsons answers e-mail and voice-mail questions about Wireless LAN questions.

To help launch this new Podcast, please leave voice mail questions at the 801.418.9018 number, or e-mail you questions to feedback@WirelessLANProfessionals.com

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4 thoughts on “000 WLA – What Is the Wireless LAN Answers Podcast?

  1. I got a question.
    Which high-gain antennas can I use with Wireless N 5Ghz? The routers and adapters usually use an array of two to three antennas. 2.4Ghz high-gain antennas don’t give any gain with 5Ghz. If there are no high-gain antennas that I can use with Wireless N 5Ghz, then how can I create 5Ghz high-gain antennas? Please explain the 5Ghz technologies. How can I use 5Ghz technologies with high-gain antennas?

    Kevin

    • Kevin,

      Thanks for the question on RF/5GHz and High Gain Antennas.

      To help answer your question… what do you mean by 'high gain'? 5dBi, 7dBi, 14dBi, 21dBi? Omni-Directional, or Directional? What type of area are you trying to cover? What are the walls/floors made from? Do you currently have an 802.11a 5GHz system? Which brand/model of 802.11n are you using? Are your clients also 802.11n 2.4GHz AND 5GHz compatible, or is that AND and OR? Is your Access Point and AND or and OR? Does your AP have 0, 2, 3, 4, or 6 antenna ports?

      In general, 5GHz radio waves don't travel near as far as 2.4GHz – additionally, there is a weaker power output limit on the 5GHz frequencies. But on the other hand, the frequency is much 'cleaner' with far less interference – and thus supports much higher throughput rates. So 5GHz is very desirable.

      Purchasing 5GHz antennas isn't a problem, very easy to come by. Depending on your access point's antenna connections you may be able to use dual frequency 2.4GHz and 5GHz both in the same physical antenna. There are also many antenna options with 2, 3, 4, or 6 built-in antennas in a single device.

      Glad to help answer your question online – or via e-mail.

      Keith

  2. I got a question.
    Which high-gain antennas can I use with Wireless N 5Ghz? The routers and adapters usually use an array of two to three antennas. 2.4Ghz high-gain antennas don’t give any gain with 5Ghz. If there are no high-gain antennas that I can use with Wireless N 5Ghz, then how can I create 5Ghz high-gain antennas? Please explain the 5Ghz technologies. How can I use 5Ghz technologies with high-gain antennas?

    Kevin

    • Kevin,

      Thanks for the question on RF/5GHz and High Gain Antennas.

      To help answer your question… what do you mean by 'high gain'? 5dBi, 7dBi, 14dBi, 21dBi? Omni-Directional, or Directional? What type of area are you trying to cover? What are the walls/floors made from? Do you currently have an 802.11a 5GHz system? Which brand/model of 802.11n are you using? Are your clients also 802.11n 2.4GHz AND 5GHz compatible, or is that AND and OR? Is your Access Point and AND or and OR? Does your AP have 0, 2, 3, 4, or 6 antenna ports?

      In general, 5GHz radio waves don't travel near as far as 2.4GHz – additionally, there is a weaker power output limit on the 5GHz frequencies. But on the other hand, the frequency is much 'cleaner' with far less interference – and thus supports much higher throughput rates. So 5GHz is very desirable.

      Purchasing 5GHz antennas isn't a problem, very easy to come by. Depending on your access point's antenna connections you may be able to use dual frequency 2.4GHz and 5GHz both in the same physical antenna. There are also many antenna options with 2, 3, 4, or 6 built-in antennas in a single device.

      Glad to help answer your question online – or via e-mail.

      Keith