WLW041 – Morality of Buying/Selling Legacy WiFi

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This should have a sub-title called:

“Here Be Dragons” – sometimes I think people selling legacy WiFi equipment are like map sellers today trying to hawk their wares by selling maps showing dragons and the world as flat!

This week is sure to cause some controversy, but hey – that’s what these kind of things are all about. Something to get other Wireless LAN Professionals talking.

The show notes are in the form of a new white paper on this subject.

Buying Legacy WiFi


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10 thoughts on “WLW041 – Morality of Buying/Selling Legacy WiFi

  1. Great article.

    I completely agree. I understand holding of new technology in some sectors and let it mature but 802.11n is mature enough. The maturation proces depends on the type of network you are deploying. While simple AP to client devices should work flawlesly, some vendor specific protocols (like multiradio mesh) require additional work on the low level coding on the chipsets. This takes time.

    Love your posts Keith!

    Gregor Vucajnk

    • Thanks for your comments.

      I agree with you, 802.11n is mature enough today. No reason whatsoever for anyone to buy or sell non-802.11n equipment in today's market.

      I'm talking about 'normal' client to AP communications.

      Have a great day,

      Keith

  2. Great article.

    I completely agree. I understand holding of new technology in some sectors and let it mature but 802.11n is mature enough. The maturation proces depends on the type of network you are deploying. While simple AP to client devices should work flawlesly, some vendor specific protocols (like multiradio mesh) require additional work on the low level coding on the chipsets. This takes time.

    Love your posts Keith!

    Gregor Vucajnk

    • Thanks for your comments.

      I agree with you, 802.11n is mature enough today. No reason whatsoever for anyone to buy or sell non-802.11n equipment in today's market.

      I'm talking about 'normal' client to AP communications.

      Have a great day,

      Keith

  3. Keith,
    First of all thanks for doing the podcast and the white paper. I know that you have had a very full plate lately, and for you to come through for all of us WLAN Professionals, on a weekly basis is very much appreciated. Keep up the good work and thanks for helping all of us by sharing your thoughts and talents on a regular basis.
    BTW, I would never sale a non .11n AP, it is morally wrong!

  4. Keith,
    First of all thanks for doing the podcast and the white paper. I know that you have had a very full plate lately, and for you to come through for all of us WLAN Professionals, on a weekly basis is very much appreciated. Keep up the good work and thanks for helping all of us by sharing your thoughts and talents on a regular basis.
    BTW, I would never sale a non .11n AP, it is morally wrong!

  5. Down to one thing.. Cost. (plus we have no real demand for 802.11n)

    If I had two or three times the budget I could buy the more expensive 802.11n, controller based gear with all its controller and licensing costs etc. (and we do have some of this kit (50 Merus), just can't afford more at the moment) but we don't. So for this years expansion and fill-in its another 50 Cisco autonomous 1130s (to add to the existing 300), at a one off cost, no license fees etc. good for another few years or at least until the economic/budgetary situation stabilises.

    (Note that we aren't a big wireless VOIP user as this would probably change the situation).

    • At least you are buying non 802.11n gear because you are conscientiously choosing to do so.

      The vendors *could* sell you the 802.11n autonomous APs at less than the price of your 1130s… *if* they wanted to.

      Though I find it hard to believe you don't have at least a pretty decent side laptop inventory that supports .11n. These have been available for years.

      .11n is much better for data – the VoIP users will only see slight improvements.

  6. Down to one thing.. Cost. (plus we have no real demand for 802.11n)

    If I had two or three times the budget I could buy the more expensive 802.11n, controller based gear with all its controller and licensing costs etc. (and we do have some of this kit (50 Merus), just can't afford more at the moment) but we don't. So for this years expansion and fill-in its another 50 Cisco autonomous 1130s (to add to the existing 300), at a one off cost, no license fees etc. good for another few years or at least until the economic/budgetary situation stabilises.

    (Note that we aren't a big wireless VOIP user as this would probably change the situation).

    • At least you are buying non 802.11n gear because you are conscientiously choosing to do so.

      The vendors *could* sell you the 802.11n autonomous APs at less than the price of your 1130s… *if* they wanted to.

      Though I find it hard to believe you don't have at least a pretty decent side laptop inventory that supports .11n. These have been available for years.

      .11n is much better for data – the VoIP users will only see slight improvements.